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Lightroom HDR Presets

Instant download, 1-click Lightroom HDR presets
Enhance your DSLR and phone photos in 1-click with our dynamic Lightroom HDR presets pack for both mobile and desktop Lightroom. These professional presets are perfect for landscape, outdoor portrait and action photos and are the exact presets we’ve developed working with 1000’s of influencers and brands to upgrade their Instagram feeds and websites.

Download Now $9

Made for Lightroom CC + Lightroom Mobile App (iOS / Android)

Hdr Pro Presets 1
Hdr Screenshot 1x

Get the HDR look that professional travel photographers, bloggers & influencers all use. A one-click solution to get high dynamic range effects that will make any photo pop! Instantly download & install in Lightroom. Step up your Instagram game today.

Adobe Lightroom

Compatible With

Adobe Lightroom Mobile (iOS or Android)
Adobe Lightroom CC
Adobe Lightroom Classic (inc older versions)

Responsive

What’s Included

9 Adobe Lightroom Presets (in 3 formats)
.dng – Mobile Lightroom
.xmp + .lrtemplate – Desktop Lightroom
PDF Installation instructions

Filter

File Types

XMP, DNG, LRTEMPLATE, PDF
Zip File: 22.60 MB

Our Lightroom HDR Presets can easily be installed on both desktop versions and the FREE Lightroom Mobile App

This Lightroom HDR presets pack is designed to work with all versions of Adobe Lightroom, including the FREE Lightroom mobile application, Lightroom CC (the paid subscription) and Lightroom Classic (version 5-9). Turn your photos into dynamic, eye-popping shots! With 9 variations of the HDR effect giving brilliant colours and tones that pop any sort of background and save those dark shadowy photos. You’ll save a huge amount of time editing your photos ready for your Instagram.

Our creative agency has worked with brands, influencers and personalities for years, creating marketing campaigns, portfolios and photo sessions that required specific workflows and color adjustments to get the most out of images. We now offer our HDR presets for purchase; tested personally on hundreds of photos by our team, and perfect for cultivating a beautiful Instagram food that fits your personality!

Download Now $9
Hdr Pro Presets 3

Lightroom HDR Presets FAQ

What is HDR?

HDR stands for High Dynamic Range and refers to the various degrees of brightness of an image and the range between them.

When you take a picture, your camera is trying to capture a lot of information. If the scene you are shooting has very bright and very dark spots, your camera may have trouble getting all the details your eyes can easily see. In these cases, your camera is likely to leave some areas completely black or wash the bright white areas off. As a result, you may end up with an image with which you may not be satisfied.

Normally, when confronted with a scene where part of the image will be overexposed (all white) or underexposed (all black), you should decide which part you can sacrifice. Some cameras are best suited for different light levels without losing detail from the lighter and darker parts, but there is always a limit.

Using an HDR setting on a digital camera or smartphone camera can help you overcome the usual limitations on dynamic range by taking several pictures with different exposures in quick succession. Some photos prefer to capture details in a darker section of the scene, while other photos prefer to capture brighter areas. The software on your camera or phone will then combine your photos into a single shot with more detail in what would otherwise be overexposed or overexposed areas.

If you are using an HDR setting, it is important to understand how your camera uses this feature. Some cameras and smartphones can create multiple files, with the final HDR photo and the photos used to create it stored as separate files. Others can take pictures and simply create a single file for the final processed image. Some cameras can also create an HDR image without taking consecutive pictures, avoiding problems with moving subjects.

How much do Lightroom HDR presets cost?

Our Lightroom HDR presets package is only USD $9. That means for $9 you’ll get a pro-grade Adobe Lightroom presets package which includes 9 separate HDR preset styles. The zip includes 3 file formats for all versions of Lightroom including the mobile app.

When should you use the HDR effect?

As we said before, the HDR is designed to help you take more beautiful pictures, especially in certain situations. This is when you should try to use HDR, keeping in mind that many newer phones have an “auto-HDR” mode, which can really make sense when the phone thinks it makes sense to shoot in HDR or not.

Low-light, backlit scenes: If your photo looks a bit dark – which is often the case if your scene has too much backlighting – the HDR can illuminate the foreground without washing the well-lit parts of your photo.

Landscapes: Landscapes tend to have a lot of contrast between the sky and the ground, which is difficult for your camera to handle with just one photograph. With HDR, you can capture details of the sky without making the ground look too dark, and vice versa.

Portraits: We all know that lighting is one of the most important aspects of a good photo, but too much light on someone’s face – under strong sunlight, for example – can lead to dark shadows, bright highlights and other unflattering features. HDR can level these and make your subject look better.

When not to use HDR

Of course, as you’ve discovered, sometimes HDR makes your photos look worse. Here are some situations where HDR is better ignored:

Moving pictures: If any of your subjects are moving (or can move), HDR increases the probability of blurry photos. Remember that HDR takes three shots, so if your subject moves between the first and second shot, the final shot will not look good.

High Contrast Scenes: Some photos look better with a sharp contrast between the dark and light parts of the photo, for example, if you have a dark shadow or silhouette you want to highlight. The HDR will make this photo look less saturated, resulting in a less interesting photo.

Bright colors: If your scene is too dark or too bright, HDR can bring back some of the colors. However, if you are dealing with colors that are already too bright, HDR can wash them away.

Fortunately, most HDR camera phones will give you two images: one with the HDR off and one with the HDR on. This means you can always give a picture to the HDR and see what the comparison looks like before you turn it off completely (as long as you have time to sit down for a few extra seconds of photography). As with all photos, you can’t miss the experiment.

How do I install Lightroom HDR presets?

Lightroom Classic (CC)

Lightroom presets allow you to apply an effect recipe to a batch of photos with a single click using Adobe Lightroom. Like Photoshop actions, Lightroom presets allow photographers to save time editing photos by quickly and easily applying common improvements to batches of photos.

1) Open your zip file.
2_ Save your Lightroom HDR presets folder to a searchable location on your computer.
3) Copy (Command + C on Mac or CTRL + C on PC) the entire preset folder.
4) Open Lightroom and select the following items from the menu bar:
5) Mac – Lightroom Classic > Preferences. PC – Edit > Preferences.
6) When the Preferences window appears, make sure you are on the Preferences tab, then click Show Light Room Development Preferences. *Note: This should take you to the location below for your computer. Include the hidden files from your show to ensure you see the locations below.
Mac: / Library / Application Support / Adobe / CameraRaw / Settings
Windows: Program data
7) Paste (Command + V on Mac or CTRL + V on PC) all the predefined collection folder in the Settings folder.

Restart your Lightroom. Your presets can be found in the Lightroom Classic panel and Camera Raw Presets.

Do professional photographers use presets?

Yes! Nowadays, most photographers, even when using film to capture their images, do their latest development in programs like Lightroom. In order to make this process easier, faster and more consistent, it is very convenient to use the development presets. They can also be used together: there are many Lightroom pre-configurations on the market, including ours.

Let’s start by clarifying one thing: presets do not capture bad images. If you have a blurry, blurry or very high or low image, presets will not help you to fix any of them and make it “good” (unless, of course, it is a “good” image because you made one or all of them on purpose, since it is part of your style). Whatever style you shoot and whatever you want to achieve with your final image, be sure to start by creating the right foundation for your work. Choose the right white balance, shutter speed, aperture and focus to suit your vision. A good foundation for your photo will save you more processing time than any preset.

What are the benefits of using Lightroom presets?

1. Save time in photo editing
The default settings allow you to apply a full set of settings to your photos and edit them with a quick click. This is much easier than going through each photo individually and applying each individual edit. Plus, by applying presets, you can even apply them fragmentarily or apply them as you import your photos, so that they automatically enter each photo! You don’t have to worry about going through hundreds of photos and applying presets to each one. By using presets, you can reduce your editing time in hours!

2. It’s a great learning tool.
If you are an amateur photographer or editor, presets can be a great tool to learn some skills! After applying presets to a photo, you can see what settings have been set and how they have been adjusted. Instead of starting from scratch and completely adjusting all controls in the hope of figuring out how to get the edit that’s on your mind, the presets will show you how that person edited your photo and achieved that vision. This opens the door for you to learn how the editing tools work and eventually feel confident enough to adjust the settings and create your own unique look!

3. Simplify your photo editing workflow
These default settings simplify your photo-editing workflow, allowing you to edit batches of photos and apply the same settings to each of them at the same time. With the simplicity of batch editing, your workflow will be much easier and your results will also improve!

What are the best settings for HDR photos?

The logical question you may be asking right now is: what settings should I change? Well, you should know that there is no general rule, since each situation is different.

We recommend that you play with a scenario that does not change within the scene you want to capture. As an example, say you are shooting a landscape with running water: if your aim is to shoot this landscape with a shutter speed of 1″, then you should adjust the ISO and/or aperture to get a lighter and darker exposure.

Another example: if you are shooting a scene that requires a large depth of field and want to use an f/13 aperture, you probably need to change the shutter speed and/or ISO instead of your aperture to get the full dynamic range of the frame.

Why? Because later in post-production it will be easier for you (or the software if you do it automatically) to combine all exposures together. The smaller the difference between one shot and another, the less complicated the final HDR image.

HDR technology originated before all “big megapixels” cameras with large sensors capable of capturing an impressive amount of detail, even in the most difficult light conditions. This is the main reason why many photographers today believe that multiple exposures are no longer necessary to capture HDR images. With better sensors, it becomes easier and faster to expose the highlights (following the famous exposure rule to the right of the histogram), and the results are almost identical.

Although recent camera sensors have significantly improved the capture of a wide dynamic range, HDR can still retain its value in some cases. For example, when there is a strong light source in the frame (such as the sun, some artificial light, etc.), it is still recommended to take more exposures because it is difficult to recover all the details in the shadows with a single shot. Even if they are successful, they will not be comparable in quality to an HDR shot. The darker shadows will be much noisier and more granular.

My advice here is to always shoot with multiple exposures in the field; then, in post-production, you can see if you can extract all the details of the darkest shot while maintaining the quality of the shot, or if you need to combine more shots to get an HDR shot.

The result is that while camera sensors have become incredibly good at capturing a wide dynamic range, they still can’t completely replace the good old-fashioned HDR technology in many cases.

What is dynamic range?

The logical question you may be asking right now is: what settings should I change? Well, you should know that there is no general rule, since each situation is different.

We recommend that you play with a scenario that does not change within the scene you want to capture. As an example, say you are shooting a landscape with running water: if your aim is to shoot this landscape with a shutter speed of 1″, then you should adjust the ISO and/or aperture to get a lighter and darker exposure.

Another example: if you are shooting a scene that requires a large depth of field and want to use an f/13 aperture, you probably need to change the shutter speed and/or ISO instead of your aperture to get the full dynamic range of the frame.

Why? Because later in post-production it will be easier for you (or the software if you do it automatically) to combine all exposures together. The smaller the difference between one shot and another, the less complicated the final HDR image.

HDR technology originated before all “big megapixels” cameras with large sensors capable of capturing an impressive amount of detail, even in the most difficult light conditions. This is the main reason why many photographers today believe that multiple exposures are no longer necessary to capture HDR images. With better sensors, it becomes easier and faster to expose the highlights (following the famous exposure rule to the right of the histogram), and the results are almost identical.

Although recent camera sensors have significantly improved the capture of a wide dynamic range, HDR can still retain its value in some cases. For example, when there is a strong light source in the frame (such as the sun, some artificial light, etc.), it is still recommended to take more exposures because it is difficult to recover all the details in the shadows with a single shot. Even if they are successful, they will not be comparable in quality to an HDR shot. The darker shadows will be much noisier and more granular.

My advice here is to always shoot with multiple exposures in the field; then, in post-production, you can see if you can extract all the details of the darkest shot while maintaining the quality of the shot, or if you need to combine more shots to get an HDR shot.

The result is that while camera sensors have become incredibly good at capturing a wide dynamic range, they still can’t completely replace the good old-fashioned HDR technology in many cases.

How can we create dynamic range?

The dynamic range is the range of brightness that can be seen or recorded in a medium.

And what is a medium? It is a substance that transmits or carries information.

In photography, the medium can be the human eye, a printed photograph, or a photograph displayed on a monitor. The dynamic range is relative, and the different media have different dynamic ranges.

Remember when we said that sometimes cameras cannot capture the same amount of brightness that we see?

When we create a high dynamic range image, we expand the dynamic range of the image by merging the exposure.

What does this mean? We merge several images with different exposures into one file. This compresses all the brightness and colors in one place.

In this way, we expand what a single exposure image cannot normally achieve. We have created an image with a highly dynamic range.

Why do we need to create HDR?

There are other good reasons why we took so long to create HDR:

It’s necessary. I told you all about the dynamic range and how our camera sometimes can’t capture the entire dynamic range.
In the name of creativity. Express the creativity inside! You can create a natural or surreal HDR effect. Nothing is right or wrong – get the HDR effects you want!
Shadow Noise Reduction. Even if some of your photos look well exposed, you can still get noise with a significant increase in shade brightness. This is due to the higher proportion of noise compared to signals in photographers. By merging in HDR, new brightness and color information is added to the pixels in the shadows.

But multiple exposures are not always necessary, depending on the images you have.

Fusing Multiple Exposures. You want to create a high dynamic range image for a high contrast scene.
It corresponds to a single image. Sometimes all you have is a single RAW file. Or maybe you want to use tonal adjustments that the HDR software can make for a monotonous image. It works best if you have a photo with mostly medium tones. Triple or double processing of a single RAW image. This means doubling your image with an extra or 2 copies. Change the exposure of the copies to, say, -1EV and +1EV. Now you have images with different exposures, and you can merge them into HDR using the first method.

How to turn HDR effect off your (Apple) phone

Apple’s latest default iPhone models automatically allow the HDR on the device’s camera, this includes the iPhone X, iPhone 8 Plus and iPhone 8. HDR can often create more beautiful photos by mixing the color range of different exposures into a single image, but it can also sometimes make photos look strange or even worse, especially in some lighting situations and with some photos of people too.

By turning off the automatic HDR on the iPhone, you also get an “HDR” button in the iPhone camera app that lets you choose which HDR to turn on, off, or on automatically depending on lighting, and directly from within the camera app itself. This contrasts with the standard state of the latest iPhones, which hides the “HDR” button, since the self-activation feature is activated by default. In other words, if you want the “HDR” buttons back in the iPhone Camera app, you must disable the “Auto HDR” function in Settings.

And yes, you can also set the HDR to be in “auto” again in the Camera application, even if Auto HDR is disabled in “Settings”. When you disable “Auto HDR” in “Settings”, it brings the controls back to the Camera application as if they were on previous iPhone models. In addition, you can also turn HDR off or enable HDR again directly from the camera application on the iPhone X, iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus. It’s certainly confusing, but that’s how it works in the current iOS versions for the latest iPhones. In fact, if you want more direct control, turn this feature off in the Settings application and then turn it on or off at will in the Camera application itself.

The “Store Original Photos” option is recommended if you want to see what an HDR and non-HDR photo looks like when the HDR photo is taken. You will see the two next to each other in the Camera Roll photo application, where possible it may look like the same photo as the thumbnail, but if you look closely at the two images you will see that they are different as the HDR pulls on a wider exposure range and then uses the software to combine them into one photo, while the standard photo does not. HDR is often loved or hated and at other times not even noticed, but for those who love iPhone camera geeks, they will certainly appreciate the choice and the ability to see both photos directly. The main disadvantage of allowing Keep Original Photo with HDR is that you end up with two (usually) identical photos.

See what our amazing customers are saying

Excellent 5-Stars 749 customer reviews

Markus M

Perfect preset pack. Great for travelling shots and anything really.

Melanie

They always fit my photos and it's perfect for a quick edit on my phone.

SakeSuka

I loved these HDR filters - so bright! Thank you.

JasonV

Installed straight away on my phone and they made a huge difference to my iPhone photos. Very impressed!

Mon

Amazing!! Love these.

749 reviews for Lightroom HDR Presets

  1. Rated 5 out of 5

    Megan S.

    This is an indispensable preset collection if you are filming family, engagement and maternity sessions.

  2. Rated 5 out of 5

    Root O.

    Perfect for my eldest daughter’s garden photo shoot!

  3. Rated 5 out of 5

    Marissa M.

    Love! Customers love it!

  4. Rated 5 out of 5

    Amanda C.

    I have two young children and I’m looking for ways to speed up editing, and beautiful presets are by far the best way to do this! Beautiful presets! Thanks.

  5. Rated 5 out of 5

    Sheila A.

    I love this collection. Especially the B / W preset, which includes the central light. 🙂

  6. Rated 5 out of 5

    Kristina C.

    I really like this collection! Adds a great moment to my images

  7. Rated 5 out of 5

    Ashley R.

    Oh, how I love the new Pretty Film pastels! I always love what I get from Brisbane !!

  8. Rated 5 out of 5

    Wanda M.

    I love my last purchase with beautiful presets. So easy to use and adds a special touch to my images.

  9. Rated 5 out of 5

    Karla S.

    I honestly live for them

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